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BMW
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History 1
History 2
History 3
History 4
History 5
History 6
History 7
History 8
History 9
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History 11
History 12
History 13

Camillo Castiglioni 1
Camillo Castiglioni 2
Camillo Castiglioni 3

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2016 100 years BMW
2016 740 e/Le
2016 760 iL
2016 M2 Coupé
2015 X-Production USA
2015 M4 GTS Concept
2015 i3
2015 7series
2015 3.0 CSL
2015 X5 xDrive 40e
2015 6series Facelift
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2015 1series
2014 X1
2014 2series Cabriolet
2014 4series Cabriolet
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2014 Mini
2014 M4 Convertible
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2014 4series Gran Coupe
2014 2series Coupe
2013 X5
2013 End six-cyl. eng.?
2013 i8
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2013 3 series GT
2012 Zagato Coupe
2012 12 cylinder
2012 7series
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2011 6ser. Convertible
2011 6ser. Coupe
2011 M 5
2011 K1600 six cyl.
2010 M3 Coupe
2010 X3
2009 X1
2009 5series - M5 2011
2008 7series
2008 F108
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2004 1
2004 1 Convertible
2003 530d
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1998 M5
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1998 320 d
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1997 Z3
1995 328i Convertible
1992 Vanos
1989 840/850
1988 K 1
1988 M3 Convertible
1988 Z 1
1987 Touring
1987 Group A DTM 23
1987 12-cylinder
1986 M3
1986 7er
1986 325 i Conv.
1985 BT 54 Turbo
1983 K 100
1983 635 CSI
1982 3er
1981 315
1981 525 i
1980 7series
1978 320 Baur
1978 M 1 Gr. 4 Procar
1978 M1
1978 635 CSI
1977 728
1976 6series
1975 1502
1975 3xx 1.Generation
1973 2002 Turbo
1971 3.0 CSL
1971 3.0 CS
1971 3.0 S
1971 Touring
1971 Baur 02
1968 2500/2800
1968 2002 ti
1968 Glas V8 3000
1968 02 Convertible
1966 02-series
1966 2000
1965 2000 CS
1964 Glas 1700 GT
1962 3200 CS
1963 1800
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1962 Semi-trailing Arms
1962 1500
1960 R 69 S
1959 Austin Mini
1959 700
1958 Glas Isar
1957 Glas Goggomobil TS
1957 600
1956 507
1956 503
1955 Glas Goggomobil T
1955 Isetta
1952 501/502
1959 340
1938 327/328
1937 WR 500
1937 327
1936 328
1936 326
1934 315
1934 309
1933 303
1932 3/20 AM 4
1932 3/20
1929 3/15 DA 3
1929 3/15 DA 2
19297 3/15 DA 1
1923 R 32
1920 First Engine
Engine Data



BMW - History (1)


The Bayrischen Motorenwerke originated from the Rapp Motorenwerke AG and the Bayerischen Flugzeugwerke AG, the latter however, only became important after 1922. The actual origin lies in the coming together of three men, two of whom played a particularly important role in the following course of the history of BMW. To start with however, we deal with Karl Friedrich Rapp, the owner of the company bearing his name and former engineer at Daimler. He constructed not very successful aircraft engines which, because of the wartime economy, were sold to the German military authorities. This company was taken over by Camillo Castiglioni, shareholder and later chairman at Austro-Daimler, a long-time independent branch of the headquarters in Stuttgart.

The time is shortly before the First World War (1914 - 1918). Since its motorisation the airplane had become an important instrument for the military powers. Austria-Hungary, then considerably more important than today, together with Germany formed the 'central powers' and accordingly, their demands were great. Together with Austro Daimler the V-12 cylinder which was constructed by Ferdinand Porsche was built, however, because of manufacturing bottlenecks. could not be deliver sufficiently. Thus, also companies whose quality was not necessarily comparable became interesting.

At that time, the third of the group made his appearance, Franz Josef Popp, First Lieutenant and a certified engineer in the field of aircraft construction. His responsibility was to supervise the building of 200 large-engine-plants inside Mr. Rapp's company, what he found however, were three wooden factory buildings, nearly 400 extremely loyal employees, but also far too many complaints from unsatisfied customers. Because contracts had already been signed and down-payments made, the Austrian military authority had no other choice than to allow the controller Popp to take the place of the, in the meantime, very ill Mr. Rapp.

Popp was responsible for the turnaround in the business developments of the Rapp-Works which in 1917, with the approval of Castiglione, he renamed because of its bad reputation, the Bayerische Motorenwerke GmbH, he stayed on however as managing director without a stock share. By the way, the white-blue emblem originated at this time from the stroboscope of a propeller. Popp bought a piece of ground on the northern border of the Oberwiesenfeld. During the course of the war Karl Rapp left the company.


Already, in his early days, Popp employed the engineer Max Fritz, like Popp he came from Daimler and despite developing famous GP racing cars in 1914, his skill was not appreciated enough. He brought with him the idea of an engine which could reach higher levels quicker, developing higher performance and having a distinctly lower consumption than the widespread Daimler engine. The solution to the problem lay in the variable intake- and carburetor technology.

First of all however, he re-constructed the vibration intense Rapp-six-cylinder, thus creating the first example of the famous in-line engine which would accompany BMW to this day (2010). For the military, this was not enough and the fulfilment of the Austro-Daimler V12 also failed. Only after they managed to realise and demonstrate the 'high-altitude-flight engine', did the success of the new company seem to be certain.

Part 2


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