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Wheel change
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Wheel Positions
Change Wheels

History-Suspension 1
History-Suspension 2
History-Suspension 3
History-Suspension 4
History-Suspension 5
History-Suspension 6
History-Suspension 7

Damper 1 - generally
Damper 2 - single-tube
Damper 3 - notch
Damper 4 - double-tube
Damper 5 - piston
Damper 6 - electronic
Damper 7 - Magnetic Ride
Damper 8 - test
Damper 9 - test
Damper 10 - repair
Damper 11 - history

Steering 1 - generally
Steering 2 - city mode
Steering 3 - track rod
Steering 4 Rack Pinion
Steering 5 - ratio
Steering 6 - var. ratio
Steering 7 - by wire
Steering 8 - ball
Steering 9 - worm roller
Steering 10 - hydraulic
Steering 11 - hydraulic
Steering 12 - pump
Steering 13 - torque
Steering 14 - electric
Steering 15 - electric
Steering 16 - safety
Steering 17 - history

Four Wheel Steering 1
Four Wheel Steering 2
Four Wheel Steering 3

Steer. Wheel 1 - generally
Steer. Wheel 2 - buttons
Steer. Wheel 3 - lock

Undercarriage 1
Undercarriage 2
Electr. Stab. Program
Dry Joint
Suspension control 1
Center of Gravity
Oblique/lateral drift angle
Elk Test
Transversal Axis
Suspension Carrier
Below View
Adj. suspension
Wheel Bearing 1
Wheel Bearing 2
Wheel Bearing 3
Wheel Bearing 4

Ind. pulse sensor
Wheel sensor 1
Wheel sensor 2

Stabilizer 1
Stabilizer 2
Stabilizer 3
Double-wishbone 1
Double-wishbone 2
Double-wishbone 3
McPherson Strut 1
McPherson Strut 2
McPherson Strut 3
McPherson Strut 4

Trailing Arm
Twist-beam Rear Axle
Space Arms
Multilink Axle
Semi-trailing Arm Axle
Rear-wheel Drive
Air suspension truck
Electr. Stab. Program
ABS/ESP-Hydr. Unit
One-arm Swing. Fork
Formula-3 Racing Car
Pend. Wheel Suspen.
Torson Crank Suspen.
Rigid Axle 1
Rigid Axle 2
Rigid Axle 3
Rigid Axle 4
Rigid Axle 5

DeDion Axle 1
DeDion Axle 2
Self steering axle
Track rod joint
Coil Spring 1
Coil Spring 2
Coil Spring 3
Leaf Spring
Torsion Bar Spring
Rubber Suspension
Hydropn. Suspension
Air Suspension 1
Air Suspension 2
Spring systems
Electr. Air Suspension
Tyre Calculation
Inch -> mm
Axle Load Distrib.
Payload Distrib.
Roller Resistance 2

Wheel suspension 1
Wheel suspension 2
Suspension 3
Suspension 4
Suspension 5
Suspension 6
Suspension 7
Suspension 8
Suspension 9
Suspension 10
Suspension 11
Suspension 12
Suspension 13
Suspension 14
Wheels 1
Wheels 2
Wheels 3
Wheels 4
Wheels 5
Wheels 6
Wheels 7
Wheels 8
Wheels 9
Wheels 10
Wheels 11
Wheels 12
Wheels 13
Suspension 1
Suspension 2
Suspension 3
Carriage 4
Suspension 5
Steering 1
Steering 2
Steering 3
Steering 4

Damper 11 - History

Last page ...


For a long time, it was not unusual that advertising brochures made a point of mentioning the hydraulic-telescopic shock absorbers in cars. The question that then arises, is what did a car look like, without shock absorbers with a piston, a cylinder and an oil filling? Which were the forerunners of today's shock absorbers? Did the old-timers perhaps, have no shock absorbers at all?


The successors to the carriage era only managed without shock absorbers, if they were equipped with multiple-leaf springing. When compressing, friction was generated by the individual spring-leaves. All the others, (e.g., those with torsion-springs) inclined, more or less, to see-sawing. This effect can only be efficiently countered by using friction dampers. Basically, they are built up similar to multi-disc dry clutches. Alternatively, steel discs with pads are placed one on top of the other. The package of steel discs is firmly connected to the external cylinder which is mounted onto the car body. The pads are firmly connected to the inner cylinder which, through a rod-linkage, is connected to the suspension. One spring, with an adjustable pre-tension, holds the rib-package together. The damping effect depends on the spring tension and the friction coefficient of the pads.
This is the reason, why friction dampers were replaced by hydraulic shock absorbers. They required too much servicing and repair, if this was not done, the handling characteristics were quite an adventure. Driving with rapidly dertiorating damper efficiency means being afraid, that on every bump in the road, the vehicle could see-saw so strongly that it becomes uncontrollable and no longer reacts to the steering. Friction dampers were still being installed until about 1960 (e.g., in the Citroen 2CV).